Wednesday, September 21, 2011

The Apocalypse Gaming Case

I've been wanting to build this portable gaming case for a while now.

No more messing around with hotel LCD rear panels or carrying the consoles in backpacks. Now we can take our gaming wherever we go.

Here's the the build details.

1) Military grade, air tight SKB hard case on wheels. Perfect size to fit in the overhead bin.



2) The screen proved to be difficult to find. I finally found a 19" LED TV that can fit nicely inside the lid. It's not a PC monitor, it's a proper 1080p HDTV that I found in Akihabara, Japan with 5mil:1 contrast ratio.
Inputs:
HDMI
Component
RCA
VGA
USB
Coax

Built in speakers and an options 3.5mm audio output


3) Find the slimmest wall mount for the LCD & bolt it inside the lid.

4) Attach memory foam pieces on the back as seen on the image. Pay attention and don't block the vent or speaker holes. These foams are crucial as they'll provide the suspension the screen needs to not to break in case of impact

5) Find a soft zipper bag for the cables (I used a travel size toiletry bag) Keep all the cables you will need inside this.

6) Case fits the original size and new size PS3s. Cables bag cushion the console. I also put two strip of memory foam on the lower section.

7) Case packs a good amount of controllers and accessories in there as well. I don't use the move controllers necessarily but wanted to see what will fit in there.

8) There is a thin layer of foam between the screen surface and the lower section so they don't contact.

9) You got to plug it to the wall wherever you go. There is no room for battery nor the desire to carry the size of battery to be able to run this gear for few hours.



















10) Off we go...















Update:
Realized that I want an HDMI system selector in there so I attached a 3x HDMI hub on the side of the lid as well.

Put an Apple TV 2 inside the cable bag and an Apple HDMI to Display port adapter.

Friday, September 9, 2011

Nike Mag Fail





















Nike built & donated 1500 pairs of Nike Mags (Marty's 2015 model shoes from Back to the Future II) to Michael J. Fox's Parkinson's disease foundation. Shoes went on auction today and with 15 hours to go, the bids are at an average of $4000 right now. Also seems Sergei Brin (co-founder of Google) will be matching whatever the auction profits. Nice.

So I realized that fans are upset because the shoes don't have power laces as they did in the movie. So basically it's a prop shoe with lights on it. As a product developer, I understand why Nike couldn't put auto lacing function on the shoe. That would need a lot of power, a big battery and motor to achieve so if they pushed for auto lacing they couldn't have came up with the same form factor.

Yet the shoe must have some circuitry and a battery to power up those LEDs and the EL lit logo. Therefore you must charge these batteries somehow. I was wondering what charging method Nike picked and was hoping for a wireless, induction charging. But seems that's not the case. From the below low res image I found on the auction site, I can tell that's an AC adapter that plugs in somewhere on the shoe.

I admire the cause and hope the shoes will fetch tens of millions of dollars but wish Nike paid some more attention to detail to make these collectibles a bit more high-tech or just current tech.

Thursday, September 8, 2011

Online Everywhere















Iridium makes satellite phones that can make a call regardless of network status. Now with this data modem you can also connect online even if you're in Antarctica. It's quite pricey but it's for those who need to go online when they need to go online.